Hawks Aloft Inc.
PO Box 10028
Albuquerque, NM 87184
Phone: 505 828-9455
Fax: 505 828-9769
E-Mail: gail@hawksaloft.org

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Hawks Aloft Blog

If You Find a Baby Bird

Robin Fledgling 6-12

A Robin fledgling discovered by Hawks Aloft Executive Director, Gail Garber

As spring progresses and the promise of summer takes shape in the form of longer, warmer days, a flurry of activity is taking place overhead. Birds are breeding and nesting, and soon, all the effort of courtship and nest building will come to fruition as a new generation hatches. For outdoor enthusiasts and bird lovers—especially those who have taken the time to provide a habitat for local birds in their yards—it is not uncommon to find a young bird, seemingly helpless and marooned. Yet, weak and clumsy as they may seem, it is a rare occasion when these youngsters need our help.

Frequently, young birds found on the ground are recent fledglings. This means they are just testing out their flight skills and it is not uncommon for them to end up grounded. If the bird appears to be mostly fully feathered, usually with short tail feathers, able to hop around and take short flights, it is likely a fledgling. If there is no looming danger to the young bird, leave it alone. Fledglings, while taking their first flights and gaining independence, are still in the care of their parents who are likely nearby. Keep pets inside and allow the bird to find its own way home. If this is an impossibility, perch the bird in a shrub or the boughs of a low tree.

Young Ferruginous Hawks

Young Ferruginous Hawks

Occasionally a nestling may fall from, or be pushed from the nest before it is ready to fledge. If the bird is naked, or with very few feathers, it is safe to assume it is a nestling. If uninjured, take some time to try to spot the nest. If possible, simply place the nestling back in its home. The pervasive myth that if a young bird is handled by a human its parents will notice the scent and abandon the young is just that—a myth. If the nest can’t be located, you may engineer a small, makeshift nest from something like a berry basket or another small container with a few channels for drainage in the bottom. Line the container with soft materials and then secure it to a tree as near as possible to where the bird was found.

There are some exceptions to these general rules, however. If you find a bird, any bird, that has been injured by a cat, call a local wildlife rehabilitator. Almost always, a bird that has been attacked by a cat will need antibiotics. At Hawks Aloft we have a 24-hour raptor rescue hotline for birds of prey, and Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is also an option for birds and other animals that need rehabilitation. In addition, if the young bird is quite evidently injured (i.e. bleeding, wings drooped unevenly) or if you are absolutely certain that the bird’s mother is dead, secure the youngster in a warm, dry, and dark space and contact a wildlife rehabilitator immediately.

Young Northern Harriers

Young Northern Harriers

The impulse to help the animals we love is strong, but sometimes that care and concern isn’t in the best interest of those we seek to help. Often, the best thing we can do for the young birds we discover grounded is to resist the urge to intervene. If you have any doubts or questions about the appropriate course of action if you’ve found a baby bird, don’t hesitate to contact Hawks Aloft or a another local wildlife rehabilitator.

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Differentiating Western and Eastern Bluebirds

After fielding a number of inquiries about how to differentiate between Western Bluebirds and Eastern Bluebirds, Gail asked me to use my space in this month’s online to detail how to distinguish these two closely related species from one another. Both species of bluebirds can now be found in the middle Rio Grande bosque year-round, but this was not always the case. During the early 1980’s Middle Rio Grande Biological Survey (Hink and Ohmart 1984), Eastern Bluebird was considered to be an uncommon winter visitor to the bosque and Western Bluebird was considered a rare visitor to the bosque between October and March. By the time we started our Middle Rio Grande Songbird Study in 2004, both species were regularly present in the bosque in at least small numbers during the winter. We began encountering Eastern Bluebirds breeding in the bosque in small numbers during summer 2004. By 2009, Eastern Bluebird had become a relatively common bosque breeder in areas with mature cottonwoods and/or large cottonwood snags. We did not begin detecting Western Bluebirds breeding in the bosque until 2011. But, Western Bluebirds have also become relatively common bosque breeders over the past two or three years, and may now be a more common bosque breeder than Eastern Bluebirds.

bluebird 1

           Eastern bluebird by David Powell

Male bluebirds are easier to identify to species than females. Males of both species have dark blue backs, wings and heads, with orange breasts. But, male Western Bluebirds have blue throats, while the male Eastern Bluebirds have orange throats. The orange on Western Bluebirds continues from the breast onto the scapulars (but NOT onto the sides of the neck) and down the back. In some individuals, nearly the entire back can be orange. In contrast, the orange on male Eastern Bluebirds continues from the breast and throat only onto the sides of the neck, with the scapulars and back remaining entirely blue. Another field mark to consider when differentiating males of these two species is belly color (this is often the quickest and easiest way to differentiate these two species). Eastern males have white bellies, while Western males have blue bellies. For those of you with particularly keen eyesight, Eastern Bluebirds (apparently) have somewhat larger bills than Western Bluebirds.

Western Bluebirds, photo courtesy of National Park Service

Western Bluebirds, photo courtesy of National Park Service

The females of these two species are more drab in coloration and more difficult to differentiate. Females of both species have bluish-gray coloration on their backs, wings and heads, as well as faded orange breasts. But, the overall patterns of coloration in females generally follows that of their male conspecifics. Female Western Bluebirds have bluish-gray throats and necks, while Female Eastern Bluebirds have white throats with orange continuing from the breasts onto the sides of the neck. Western females may have some faint orange coloration on their scapulars and backs, which the Eastern females lack. As with males, belly color can often be the easiest way to differentiate the females of these two species: Western females have grayish to bluish-gray bellies while Eastern females have bright white bellies.

When I encounter bluebirds in the field, the first things I look at are throat color and belly color. If the throat color is the same as the head color and the belly color is blue (in males) or gray to bluish-gray (in females) then I know I’m looking at Western Bluebirds. If the throat color differs from the head color and the belly is white, then I know I’m looking at Eastern Bluebirds. One final note: During winter these two species may occur in mixed flocks (and on rare occasions may be joined by Mountain Bluebirds) in the middle Rio Grande valley. This usually occurs in prime winter foraging areas with large Russian olive and/or New Mexico olive berry crops (or other vegetation supporting large berry crops). In general, however, these species seem to prefer the company of their own species.

Good luck with your bluebirding!

Eastern Bluebird by David Powell

Eastern Bluebird by David Powell

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Get to Know Amanda Schluter, Hawks Aloft Intern

Amanda Schluter joined Hawks Aloft this January as a seasonal intern during a lull in her work season with the U.S. Forest Service. Amanda comes to Hawks Aloft with a strong background in field surveys and with lots of enthusiasm.

Amanda in the Grand Tetons during the summer of 2015

Amanda in the Grand Tetons during the summer of 2015



What’s your educational background?

I graduated in 2011 from the University of New Mexico with a BS in Biology and Biological Anthropology.

Cave in Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ. Taken in Summer 2015.

Cave in Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ. Taken in Summer 2015.


Tell us about your work history with the National Forest Service

After graduation, I worked as a biological science technician at the Cibola National Forest in the Mt. Taylor Ranger District for the summers of 2012 and 2013. My job was to conduct Mexican Spotted Owl and Northern Goshawk surveys for the majority of the field season (April through August). Because my employment was partially funding by the forestry division of the district, I also assisted them in timber sale layouts after the bird surveys were complete. I also assisted the Rangeland Management team with various surveys and recreation needs with campground and trail maintenance. This was a great way to understand the different roles of the various groups within the forest service.

For the 2014 field season, I worked in Pioneer, California on the Eldorado National Forest, located south of Lake Tahoe along Carson Pass. The majority of my work consisted of doing Northern Spotted Owl and Northern Goshawk surveys but I also was able to assist with stream bank alteration surveys and yellow-legged frog surveys.

For the 2015 field season with the Forest service, I worked in Flagstaff, Arizona in the Coconino National Forest. I was still mostly doing Mexican Spotted Owl and Northern Goshawk surveys. I also surveyed for Peregrine Falcon, narrow-headed garter snake, northern and lowland leopard frog, bats, and some sensitive plant species. I also assisted in the relocation of a prairie dog colony. This forest is unique because it has a large number of Spotted Owls which made surveying for them very fun.

Bear River Reservoir in Eldorado National Forest. Taken Summer 2014.

Bear River Reservoir in Eldorado National Forest. Taken Summer 2014.


How did you hear about Hawks Aloft?

I heard about Hawks Aloft from one of the volunteers, Chellye Porter. She heard about my work history and thought that I would be interesting in volunteering. She then put me into contact with Gail.

What has been your favorite experience so far at Hawks Aloft?

I have had a lot of survey experience but I had never surveyed for songbirds. I have really enjoyed that experience. I really appreciate how it makes you slow down and pay attention to your surroundings. Plus, I enjoy seeing the birds and identifying them.

I also really get a lot of enjoyment from visiting local schools for education programs. All the students have been really great and love to learn about the different raptors that we bring. Their excitement is contagious and it is great to teach someone something new.

Landscape from Coconino National Forest

Landscape from Coconino National Forest


What do you hope to learn here and how will it inform your future work?

Since the majority of my work in the past has been surveys for raptors, I really wanted to learn more about the songbird surveys and also migratory bird surveys. I also am interested in getting a different work experience beyond that. Being able to handle the birds and teach others about them is very appealing to me.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

Outside of work, I like to go camping and hiking a lot with my dog, Dexter. I also love crafts like knitting, crocheting and card making. Most weekends my friends and I will go to a local brewery or out to eat somewhere.

Amanda near Lake Tahoe, in California, Summer 2014

Amanda near Lake Tahoe, in California, Summer 2014

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Introducing Aztec

Photograph of Aztec by David Powell

Photograph of Aztec by David Powell

Although we’re not certain what happened to her, Aztec, the Great Horned Owl was brought to Hawks Aloft with some permanent injuries most likely caused by a collision with a car. She earned her name because she came to us from Aztec, New Mexico, in the Four Corners region, a small city near the Animas River, bordered by the ancient ruins at Aztec Ruins National Monument.

Photograph of Aztec by Keith Bauer

Photograph of Aztec by Keith Bauer

Aztec is a striking bird. One of the largest tufted owls in North America, Great Horned Owls like Aztec always attract attention. Aztec has fostered orphaned Great Horned Owlets in the past, and also has also provided Hawks Aloft educators with an opportunity to talk about raptor adaptations, owls in general, and the unique features of Great Horned Owls in particular.

Great Horned Owls are one of the most common owls in the United States. They are highly adaptable and make their homes in diverse landscapes—deserts, wetlands, grasslands, and urban environments—anywhere that there is some forested areas with semi-open spaces interspersed throughout.

Aztec at Bosque del Apache

Aztec at Bosque del Apache. Image by David Powell.

This common and easily identifiable species of owl is noted for its long, earlike tufts, the white patch on its throat, its heavily barred underbelly, and distinctive hoot. Below you can listen to the typical call of a Great Horned Owl.

The tone of the Great Horned Owl’s various calls can vary by region, but the deep series of 4-5 hoots is never so different that it can’t be readily identified. However, males and females are known to perform a call-and-response duet, wherein the sex of the birds are distinguished by their variation.

Great Horned Owls, like all raptors, are carnivores. Built for secrecy and stealth, these birds can take down birds and mammals that are larger than themselves. They’re not picky eaters and have one of the most diverse diets of raptors in the United States. They’ll feed on small mammals and rodents, as well as scorpions, snakes, loons, ravens, doves, insects, fish, other invertebrate and even cats and carrion—whatever is readily available. They are one of the only birds known to prey on skunks—they have a weak sense of smell—and the Executive Director of Hawks Aloft has even observed a Great Horned Owl that managed to snag a Red-tailed Hawk. It’s Great Horned Owl’s incredible adaptability that has made them one of the most successful predators in North America. Typically, these owls spot their prey from a perch and descend for the kill. Yet, illustrating their versatility, Great Horned Owls have even been observed stalking prey on the ground too.

A wild Great Horned Owl and owlets captured by Larry Rimer

A wild Great Horned Owl and owlets.  Image by Larry Rimer

Owls like Aztec are sometimes migratory, although most populations show fidelity to a single site year-round, where they remain in their monogamous pair—though outside of breeding season, the male and female often roost separately.

If you’ve fallen in love with Great Horned Owls and Aztec, consider supporting her as she lives out her remaining years with Hawks Aloft. Aztec’s injuries make her permanently non-releasable, so she requires care from our staff. If you’d like to support her by providing food, housing, and veterinary care check out our Adopt-A-Raptor Program.


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Maggie Grimason is a writer and educator at Hawks Aloft

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Through the Eyes of an Intern: Part 1

 

Education Specialist Taylor Tvede teaching students about Harlan the Red-tailed Hawk.

The first few weeks of my internship were spent assisting with education programs at local elementary schools.  Half of the programs consisted of bringing two avian ambassadors  to the school and giving a presentation regarding the bird and its history. The other half of the program was an activity to teach the students concepts about natural science. Since I have a history of work with the U.S. Forest Service, I found one activity, the fire ecology game, to be very interesting.

The fire ecology game consisted of having children act out two different scenarios that represent the very different outcomes of forest fires. In the first scenario, the children are divided into groups of mature healthy trees, immature trees, dead trees on the ground or mature unhealthy trees (these are given a bug to represent their illness). The mature trees were spaced out evenly with immature trees kneeling under them. One student is then given “the fire stick” and told to tap their classmates that are sick or dead trees. This action leaves the healthy mature trees enough room to stretch out and the immature trees enough room to grow.

Can you spot the wildlife? Taken in the Coconino National Forest in Flagstaff, Arizona by Amanda Schluter

Can you spot the wildlife? Taken in the Coconino National Forest in Flagstaff, Arizona by Amanda Schluter

The next scenario in the activity represented a forest that has had wildfires suppressed for years. Students were divided into the same groups as before with some assigned as healthy, mature trees and others as immature trees kneeling under them. Among these were still the unhealthy trees, which were again given plastic insects to distinguish them. Then, without any of the students moving an inch, the immature trees were told to stand up.  Everyone became very crowded. Then the unhealthy trees gave one or two of their bugs to a tree that was standing next to them, spreading their disease because the forest had become overcrowded. Then the student that represented fire went through and tapped all the sick and dead trees. After the fire, there were very few or no trees remaining.

From The Eldorado National Forest, Amador Ranger District. Taken by Hannah Wheelen

From The Eldorado National Forest, Amador Ranger District. Taken by Hannah Wheelen

The purpose of this exercise was to demonstrate that not all fire is bad for the environment. At the beginning of the exercise the students all believe that fire can only be bad. Beginning in the 1890s many of the forests in New Mexico have had fire suppression in place and have become overgrown. Prior to the suppression of fires, New Mexico forests were subject to frequent low intensity fires every few years. Because of this, forests did not become overgrown, which, in turn, kept future fires from burning out of control. With new scientific studies, this history has come to light and the Forest Service, along with other government agencies, is working to remedy past mistakes. This often requires forest-thinning projects followed by controlled burns.

Fire is such an important part of southwestern ecology. In fact, many plant species will only reproduce after a fire. The increase in plant reproduction is due to the nutrient rich soil, the increase in water availability, and newly available real estate opened up by the fire. Firefighters have noted that deer and elk will follow behind a fire and eat the burnt grass like they are attending a neighborhood barbeque. Many predators can be found in burn areas because their prey is attracted to the nutrient rich plants that are found growing there.

At first glance this appeared to be a strange cloud by upon further inspection it was discovered to be the King Fire (2014) on the El Dorado National Forest. This picture was taken from Pioneer , CA approximately 60 miles away  by Amanda Schluter

At first glance this appeared to be a strange cloud by upon further inspection it was discovered to be the King Fire (2014) on the El Dorado National Forest. This picture was taken from Pioneer , CA approximately 60 miles away by Amanda Schluter

When a fire burns out of control in an overgrown forest, there can be devastating repercussions. Not only can people lose their homes, but, if all the trees in an area are burned, this can create many hazards. Without the trees, there can be severe flooding and mudslides. In addition, if there are no mature trees in an area, the landscape cannot be repopulated. After catastrophic fires, tree saplings are often planted in the area, but it can take decades before noticeable change is seen.

Picture of the scar from the Little Bear fire from the Gila National Forest that occurred in 2012, Picture was taken in 2014 by Amanda Schulter

Picture of the scar from the Little Bear fire from the Gila National Forest that occurred in 2012, Picture was taken in 2014 by Amanda Schulter

Fire ecology is a complex concept and many adults are still unaware of its importance in the balance of an ecosystem—especially that of the southwest. Teaching students about the importance of fire ecology will lead to a future generation that has a greater understanding of the ecosystem that they live in.

Sunset in the Eldorado National Forest on the Amador Ranger District taken by Hannah Wheelen.

Sunset in the Eldorado National Forest on the Amador Ranger District taken by Hannah Wheelen.


 

References:

Touchan, R., Allen, C.D. and Swetnam, T.W., 1996. Fire history and climatic patterns in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests of the Jemez Mountains, northern New Mexico. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT RM, pp.33-46.

Swetnam, T.W. and Dieterich, J.H., 1985. Fire history of ponderosa pine forests in the Gila Wilderness, New Mexico. In Proceedings—symposium and workshop on wilderness fire. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-182, Ogden, UT: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

 Dieterich, J.H., 1983. Fire history of southwestern mixed conifer: a case study. Forest Ecology and Management, 6(1), pp.13-31.


 

Amanda Schluter Bio Image

 

Amanda Schulter is a field technician for the U.S. Forest Service and the current intern at Hawks Aloft. 

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Why is the Crow Black? And Other Interesting Thoughts on the North American Crow

Last week during a school program at La Mesa Elementary School, we presented our Avian Ambassador, Indigo, a North American Crow. After discussing her history and talking about raptor adaptations and how a bird like Indigo differs from hawks, falcons, owls, and eagles, I asked the students if they had any questions.

Avian Ambassador Indigo, enjoying some sunshine

Avian Ambassador Indigo, enjoying some sunshine

A third-grader in the back of the room hoisted his hand up immediately and asked pointedly, “Why are crows black?” It is such a straightforward question, but one with a complex answer.

The answer is: no one really knows why species of corvid like the North American Crow or the Common Raven are black in coloration. The best guess that evolutionary biologists can give us is that flocking birds like crows use coloration as a quick way to identify other members of the same species.

A North American food scavenging tortillas behind Bueno Foods

A North American Crow scavenging tortillas behind Bueno Foods

In one story from the Sioux Nation, the crow was once white as snow. After continually thwarting the hunting efforts of the tribe’s cleverest hunters, they caught the biggest, most important of the crows and, as a punishment, intended to burn him. The crow was very sly, however, and got away, but his feathers were charred, and ever since, all crows have been black. In Lenape legend, the crow was once rainbow colored—the earth’s most beautifully feathered bird. During a long, very cold winter, the Rainbow Crow flew to the heavens to ask the Great Sky Spirit for help. He gave the crow fire to take back to the animals of the land. When Rainbow Crow returned to earth, however, he was a different bird; on the return journey the flame had scorched his feathers black and made his beautiful voice a harsh croak.

Regardless of why or how, crows and ravens are black from their bills to their legs. As extremely social birds, crows sometimes form flocks up to one million in number. Just imagine what that might look like overhead!

Indigo, photograph by Doug Brown

Indigo, photograph by Doug Brown

Besides being one of the few completely black North American birds, crows are also exceptional due to their advanced cognitive abilities. Scientists working throughout the world have proven the crow’s ability to recognize human faces—which is, incidentally, an extension of their keen ability to recognize one another. Crows are also known to have complex communication systems that include regional “dialects” and a long-reaching memory—for example, crows have been known to change their entire migration routes to avoid farms where a single crow has been killed in the past.

Since crows are well adapted to living among human beings, you’re likely to encounter them nearly anywhere—Downtown, Uptown, the foothills, near the Bosque, and beyond. Next time you observe one of these dark birds flying overhead, take a moment to appreciate their unique characteristics and intelligence.


 

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Maggie Grimason is a writer and educator at Hawks Aloft

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Through the Looking Glass

I’ll never forget the morning when, as I sat studying outside in front of the large picture windows of my university’s library, a hummingbird collided violently with the large pane of glass. I watched the bird, which seemed so weightless in flight, fall heavily to the cement sidewalk. I was almost equally stunned. Several moments passed and the bird rose, shook itself, and flew off again.

This is the best case scenario for a bird involved in a collision with glass; most are not so lucky. Ornithologists at Cornell University estimate that one million birds are killed each year as a result of run-ins with glass windows. Some researchers put that number closer to one billion. According to the American Bird Conservancy, each household in the United States kills two birds every year, simply by having windows that aren’t adapted to the avian life around them. What’s worse, these fatal collisions are most likely to happen at home sites that have active feeders, since they attract more birds to begin with.

A dove leaves its mark on a window after a colliding with it. Photo by Steve Elkins

A dove leaves its mark on a window after a colliding with it. Photo by Steve Elkins

Birds aren’t cued in to the architectural elements that help us recognize windows, instead they see the reflection of the world around them or look through the window to another window on the opposite side of the house and see a gap to fly through, connecting them to more of their habitat. Frequently, during mating season, particularly territorial species may exhaust themselves bickering with their own reflections in windows, leading to exhaustion.

One of our avian ambassadors perplexed by his reflection in the mirror

One of our avian ambassadors perplexed by his reflection in the mirror

For bird-lovers cognizant of the risks that windows pose, there are several options that can make your home more accommodating to the wildlife around you. Research has shown that birds generally avoid flying through vertical lines four inches apart or less and horizontal lines two inches apart or less, so there are innumerable ways to break up a wide pane of glass and communicate the barrier to your backyard bird friends; surely one will appeal to you and suit the design of your home.

One simple and aesthetically pleasing DIY solution is incorporating paracord, also known as parachute cord, outside of your window. Sometimes called zen wind curtains, these heavy cords are hung several inches apart near the top of the window and weighted with knots at the bottom. The dark colored cords break up the windows sufficiently and achieve an estimated 90 to 100 percent reduction in bird glass collisions, and are pretty attractive to boot.

There also are several different varieties of adhesive tape that can be applied in patterns to windows that obscure the clarity of the window just enough to deter birds without compromising the striking New Mexican sunshine that filters through. These options include American Bird Conservancy developed Bird Tape, durable enough to last up to four years; bird-safety films that can be applied in striped patterns or as a solid coat over glass—these have added benefits of reducing heating and cooling costs and providing greater insulation in your home; and there is also adhesive dots that can be applied in a “frit pattern” that is pleasing to the eye while simultaneously protecting birds.

A pigeon leaves its impression on a window. Photo by Steve Elkins

A pigeon leaves its impression on a window. Photo by Steve Elkins

Other helpful and easy fixes include relocating feeders farther from troublesome windows, hanging lightweight, reflective objects (i.e., all those old CD’s that have practically become obsolete), or even attaching branches on the exterior of your home that obscure windows and slow down birds as they approach.
Glass collisions impact migratory and backyard bird populations to an undue degree, including a number of threatened species. Because collisions are just as likely to injure or kill a healthy, breeding bird as a less robust individual, their impact on bird populations is even more worrisome. Simply considering the design of your windows and the ways in which you can make them more bird-safe can provide a boon to your local bird population.

For more information on products that can be applied to your home, check out the American Bird Conservancy’s bird-smart glass product tests and suggestions.


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Maggie Grimason is a writer and educator at Hawks Aloft

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Adventures on the Armendaris

This summer the Hawks Aloft team was granted nearly unlimited access to the expansive Armendaris Ranch owned by Ted Turner. The ranch itself stretches from Truth or Consequences in the south all the way to Bosque del Apache, encompassing a whole mountain range and thousands of acres of habitat for all kinds of wildlife.

 

But we came for the bats. The Armendaris Ranch plays host to many lava tubes, and those lava tubes are the home of a massive maternity colony of Mexican free tail bats. When these bats make their nightly departure from the tubes, they put on quite a show—namely, the second largest bat flight in North America.

Image by Greg Basco

Image by Greg Basco

Braving a long, bumpy ride down many unmarked dirt roads, the staff and volunteers of Hawks Aloft finally made it to our home for the night, a patch of land near the opening of the tubes where we would be camping. As dusk settled over the landscape, the bats began their exit, and all throughout the night they continued. The impressive bat population in this area also means that there are a large number of raptors that feed on the bats, like Swainson’s Hawks.

image by Doug Brown

Image by Doug Brown

There was plenty of life on the ground, as well, including other birds like roadrunners and quail.

Image by Keith Bauer

Image by Keith Bauer

Image by Larry Rimer

Image by Larry Rimer

Unique mammals abound throughout the vast property. We were lucky enough to see oryx, bison, fox, and bobcats.

Image by Arash Hazeghi

Image by Arash Hazeghi

Image by Doug Brown

Image by Doug Brown

Image by Emmitt Booher

Image by Emmitt Booher

In addition to the abundance of fauna on the Armendaris, there is a wealth of native plants including cottonwood, willow, and native grasses.  The untouched landscape provides a great habitat for threatened and endangered species, such as the bolson tortoise.

Image by Emmitt Booher

Image by Emmitt Booher

The Armendaris Ranch is a fantastic example of what it means to be effective stewards of the land, and provided us with a great example of well managed New Mexican habitat.


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Maggie Grimason is a writer and educator at Hawks Aloft

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2015 Return of the Sandhill Crane Celebration

cranesssss

On Saturday, November 14th, you can visit Hawks Aloft staff, volunteers, and a few of our Avian Ambassadors at the 2015 Return of the Sandhill Crane Celebration at Albuquerque’s Open Space Visitors Center (6500 Coors NW). Now in its 8th year, this festival is one-day only welcome back to the city’s wintering Sandhill Crane populations.

Hawks Aloft will be tabling for the entire length of the event, which will be held from 9am to 5pm. In addition to the opportunity to view wildlife, the event will include speakers, presentations, and nature walks that contextualize winter migration for visitors, as well as screenings of local films and musicals like Love in the Bosque. Vendors will have handcrafted wares for sale and the music of locals Bethany and Quinn Boyack will accompany you while you shop. You can even learn some tai chi or practice your origami skills!

Many Sandhill Cranes winter in the Middle Rio Grande Valley, foraging for seeds, roots, bugs, and worms during the day in open fields and at night making their way to the shallow sandbars of the river. Reaching heights of more than five feet and achieving lifespans of nearly 20 years, these graceful birds are always memorable and impressive to behold. Honoring the Sandhill Crane and other birds on their winter migratory path is a great way to mark the changing of the seasons and acknowledge the intelligence and beauty of the natural world. Please join us at this year’s Return of the Sandhill Crane Celebration.


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Maggie Grimason is a writer and educator at Hawks Aloft

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Rescuing A Golden Eagle – It Took a Village

Often, folks who call about injured raptors over estimate the size of the injured bird, but not always.  Such was the case when, on December 9, 2014, we received a call from David Berryman and Craig Sizemore from the Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative.  He said, “we rescued a hawk in  Estancia, NM.”  We dispatched Julia Davis, our Education Coordinator, to go pick up the hawk.  When she arrived back at our office, the hawk was wrapped in a warm, insulated canvas, winter-weight jacket and stuffed into a long but very narrow box.  We took a peek at the tail feathers and new immediately that THIS WAS NO HAWK!

Examining the injured wing of the Golden Eagle

Examining the injured wing of the Golden Eagle

We wondered just how they had managed to stuff the eagle into the small box.  Our patient, a hatch year Golden Eagle,  seemed nonplussed by the whole affair, and nonchalantly withstood poking and prodding.   The eagle had damage to the hand area of the left wing, with severe abrasions and blot clots.  We cleaned and wrapped the wing, and examined rest of the bird for further injuries.

Extending the let to look for injuries

Extending the let to look for injuries

We marveled at the size of the eagle’s feet as well as the weight of the bird.

Golden Eagle feet

Golden Eagle feet

Gail and the Golden EagleWe sent the eagle to one of our veterinarians in Albuquerque for assessment, but got a return call that they could not take care of the bird.  It soon became apparent that this fellow was beyond our capabilities here as we do not have sufficient facilities to care for a bird of this size.  We called in The Wildlife Center in Espanola, NM.  Katherine Eagleson, Executive Director, graciously agreed to take the bird and even drive to Santa Fe to meet us. Before we sent him off, we took some images to illustrate the size of a Golden Eagle relative to other hawks.  This time, the eagle traveled in style in an eagle-sized crate with Julia again as his driver.

The Wildlife Center has communicated regularly regarding the progress of this patient, one of the most gorgeous birds we’ve ever had the privilege of rescuing.  According to Kerrin Grant, Wildlife Care Director at the Wildlife Center, the injury appears to be entanglement with a barbed wire fence. The wingtip of the eagle eventually died and had to be removed so this handsome fella will not be releasable.

Golden Eagle rescued in Estancia by Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative.  Image by Kerrin Grant.

Golden Eagle rescued in Estancia by Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative. Image by Kerrin Grant.

Although the eagle remains in recovery, The Wildlife Center will be seeking permanent accommodations for this young bird, perhaps at one of the eagle aviaries owned by a Native American Tribal Government.  We wish this beautiful bird well in his future.  We thank everyone who had a hand in saving him:  Central New Mexico Electric Coop, The Wildlife Center, and Hawks Aloft — all working together to find the best solution for an extraordinary bird.

Rescued Golden Eagle. Image by Kerrin Grant, The Wildlife Center

Rescued Golden Eagle. Image by Kerrin Grant, The Wildlife Center

 

 

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