Hawks Aloft Inc.
PO Box 10028
Albuquerque, NM 87184
Phone: 505 828-9455
Fax: 505 828-9769
E-Mail: gail@hawksaloft.org

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Hawks Aloft Blog

Eagle Updates from the Navajo Nation

The first of the eagles came to us on March 16. The bird–a juvenile Bald Eagle–had sustained a gunshot wound to the left wing, the tail feathers plucked, and had been left grounded for an unknown amount of time before an anonymous person discovered the bird and delivered it to the Navajo Nation Zoological Park.

 

The first Bald Eagle to arrive in care. Image by Larry Rimer

Immense efforts were undertaken to save the eagle’s life. Hawks Aloft volunteers Larry and Kim Rimer drove to Window Rock to pick up the eagle, transporting it to Gail Garber’s house in Albuquerque, then to Santa Fe, where Ty Horak and Nirankar Ambriz transported the eagle the last leg–to Cottonwood Rehab in Espanola and the care of Doctor Kathleen Ramsay. Though triage and surgery were quickly underway, existing infection from the birds injuries and hours on the ground eventually took this Bald Eagle’s life.

The second eagle in recovery

Just a few days later, on March 21, another eagle arrived with a similar story to tell. The bird had been shot and its tail feathers removed. Arlette Miller, our Raptor Rescue Dispatcher, took the call from the Navajo National Zoo and immediately set out from Albuquerque to Window Rock, then bringing the bird, again, to Doctor Ramsay for an emergency surgery.

It was determined over the course of this eagle’s lengthy recovery time that, although it could live happily in captivity, permanent injuries mean it will not be returned to the wild. This adult male Golden Eagle will live out the remainder of his life at the Navajo Nation Eagle Sanctuary, educating visitors with his story.

On March 30, yet another Golden Eagle was found in the same state as the first two.

A second Golden Eagle arrives with tail feathers removed

Discovered by a Navajo Agricultural Products Industry employee, this female Golden Eagle was quickly delivered to the Navajo Nation Zoo where emergency triage was performed. Chad Smith soon thereafter brought the bird to Albuquerque where Dr. Kariana Atkinson of Petroglyph Animal Hospital performed further triage and took X-rays.

At first hopeful that this bird might be re-released post-surgery, Dr. Atkinson’s team performed surgery to repair the bird’s humerus bone. Over the course of recovery, however, it became apparent that this bird, too, must remain in captivity for the rest of her life under expert care at the Navajo National Eagle Sanctuary.

Though under continued investigation by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Navajo Department of Game and Fish, the perpetrators have not yet been apprehended.

In late July representatives from Hawks Aloft attended a press conference at the Navajo Nation Zoo in Window Rock to receive news of the birds. Gail Garber, below, reports on the conference.

On Tuesday, July 31, 2018, Larry Rimer, Dr. Kathleen Ramsay, Lori Paras and I attended the press conference at the Navajo Nation Zoo in Window Rock. Below, I share comments from the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife and also the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Navajo Nation Statement:
Golden Eagles, one of the most sacred birds to the Navajo People, have many threats to their survival on the Navajo Nation. They are threatened by climate change, drought, and excessive grazing, leading to low prey availability, disturbances to their nesting and hunting areas, lead poisoning, powerline electrocutions, vehicle strikes and other accidents. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife has been dealing another serious threat as well, illegal shooting for feathers.
The most recent of these illegal acts occurred in March 2018, as the Department’s Wildlife Law Enforcement Program responded to numerous calls regarding eagles shot with their tail feathers removed. These heinous acts were conducted solely for financial benefit, going against federal laws, tribal code, and the spiritual sacredness of the Golden Eagle.
Today, July 31, 2018, the Department is welcoming two of these Golden Eagles back to the Navajo Nation; unfortunately they both were severely injured from the gunshots and cannot be returned to the wild. Both eagles will remain in captivity at the Navajo Nation Eagle Sanctuary and will be cared for by the expert staff of the Navajo Nation Zoo for the remainder of their lives.

At the Navajo Nation Eagle Sanctuary. Image by Larry Rimer

Although we are pleased to be able to provide a home for these two eagles with our federally-permitted Eagle Sanctuary, the Department is disgusted by the acts of this person(s) that shot these eagles and removed their tail feathers. All efforts are being made by the Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to apprehend these violators.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Statement:
These rehabilitated eagles represent both the extreme cruelty and compassion of people. The Service is still investigating these crimes and hopes to see justice done. A reward is being offered for information in the case. We thank our partners, both those helping with the investigation and the rehabilitators who tended to these birds. We recognize the importance of eagles to our tribal partners and will continue to work through our tribal aviary program and National Eagle Repository to provide a legal source of feathers for cultural and religious needs.

We, at Hawks Aloft, want to recognizes and thank all of the partners who helped in the care and transport of these birds: David Mikesic and his staff at the Navajo Nation Zoo. Dr. Kariana Atkinson and Dr. Ray Hudgell at Petroglyph Animal Hospital, Dr. Kathleen Ramsay at Cottonwood Rehabilitation, Lori Paras at Santa Fe Raptor Center, Larry and Kim Rimer, Arlette Miller, Katrina Hucks, James Robinson, Nirankar Ambriz, Ty Horak, and Lisa Morgan.

 

 

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